Cookingbookclub 23

At today’s #cookingbookclub we have Tiffany Thiessen, Kelly from Save the Bell, our favorite childhood series. 🙂 Tiffany grew up and after many roles, a husband and two children, she started cooking on TV for about three seasons, after which she also wrote a cookbook and made a website, just good for inspiration. 🙂

I quickly looked at the recipes, she is a big fan of quinoa and Texan food, but I’m sure we’ll find an idea or two that will help us in our green kitchen. 🙂

This month you’re looking for recipes that use less energy, to find out if it’s possible or not, and try to buy less plastic.

Don’t forget to leave a comment with the recipes you tried and liked. Which I will also do next month. 🙂

#cookingbookclub #letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen is turning green.

Join the kitchen disaster community on our Facebook page or follow us on Instagram or Pinterest.

Read all the #cookingbookclub articles here. See here all the disasters in the kitchen. And if you’re passionate about #cakesandcoffee, click here. Remember that prevention is easier than treating and that you can’t burn recipes successfully if you don’t know first aid in the kitchen – read more here.

[greenkitchen5] – this year I use less energy and plastic

You know how it is, theory as theory, practice kills us. Perfectly illustrated by the theme of today’s episode. 🙂 It’s time to talk about energy and plastic in our green kitchen.

If you came here by chance, we’re not talking about painting the walls green or buying green dishes. 😛 Because we are concerned about the planet, we try to change our behavior towards food so that we live an ethical, sustainable and environmentally friendly life. Do you think I’m talking about fiction? 🙂 Fortunately, my friends and I have been testing these principles for many years, and we know that we can learn something new every day. Which I recommend to you too. 🙂

So, let’s recap this year’s lessons: we throw away as little food as possible, because we have a shopping list and plan what we want to eat, we never throw away fries or ice cream (never ever!!!!) and we are fans of salad, vegetables and fruits at least half a plate, some of us have days with vegetables and if we have leftovers, we recombine them, freeze them and eat them. We eat everything and sometimes we lick the plate. 😀

The big question is how to use as little energy as possible and how to get rid of plastic. Whoever finds the perfect solution will probably receive a Nobel Prize.

I BUY

I use reusable shopping bags instead of plastic bags

I buy fruits and vegetables that are not in plastic bags

I use reusable containers where possible (eg olives)

I buy in bulk, where possible

I buy from eco-friendly stores

I buy energy efficient equipments

I COOK

I cook as simple as possible

I cook with fresh ingredients that do not require heat processing

I cook with plastic-free utensils

I use energy efficient appliances

I ORDER

I order mix of processed food and unprocessed food (salads)

I order in reusable containers

I order in recyclable or compostable containers

I have a reusable cup of coffee

I avoid disposable packaging

I order from nearby locations

I order from locations with energy efficiency policies (are there any?)

It is very interesting how we have changed all our ecological behaviors in 30 years, because plastic is a recent invention, and Romanians have gone through years of major power outages. For example, the fact that I allow myself to cook more portions and freeze is a merit of the present times – we will see how long it will be possible, because before ’89 it would not have been possible.

As for energy efficiency, this cannot be done overnight. But when you are planning a renovation or your appliance breaks down, one of the purchasing criteria may be energy efficiency. On the other hand, I don’t know which is more eco-friendly, an old appliance that consumes more but can be repaired and used for many years, or a new appliance that consumes less but which, when broken, ends up in the trash?

I think that the most energy efficient cooking is quite logical: anything that you can cook without a fire/ fridge/ mixer and eat quickly; in summer and autumn when you have many options, it is quite easy; winter is more complicated. Also, it is more efficient to cook more dishes in a day, which will last you for a week, than to burn the oven for three days in a row – especially if it is one like mine, which is slower to heat.

As for plastic, we would get rid of this problem if it weren’t all plastic. If that’s not possible, at least let’s get rid of disposable plastic.

#letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen is turning green. Read all the episodes here. And if you’re a beginner disaster, here is a crash class in cooking.

Cookingbookclub 22

I am pretty sure you will like David Lebovitz, who is the inspiration of the month at #cookingbookclub #disasterinthekitchen with number 22. He has many recipes inspired from the French cuisine, which come with beautiful and interesting stories. And he has a lot of jam recipes, mmmmm.

You can find his website here, but I recommend the books, they are an extremely enjoyable read. And you can find him on Instagram, where he sometimes tells what he buys from the market. Fabulous. :))

Don’t forget to leave a comment if you have tried any recipe and you particularly liked it. Mine are coming in a month. 🙂

#cookingbookclub #letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen is turning green.

Join the kitchen disaster community on our Facebook page or follow us on Instagram or Pinterest.

Read all the #cookingbookclub articles here. See here all the disasters in the kitchen. And if you’re passionate about #cakesandcoffee, click here. Remember that prevention is easier than treating and that you can’t burn recipes successfully if you don’t know first aid in the kitchen – read more here.

[greenkitchen4] – this year I learn to preserve food

In our lands, the preservation of food during the periods of surplus for the gray days is an ancient custom, which is still preserved in some households. The process has a cyclicity related to local seasons and traditions. Of course, nowadays you don’t need to put potatoes, onions and carrots in the cellar in the autumn, because you can find them in the store. And sometimes the cumulative cost of preparing canned food (ingredients, utilities, energy and personal time) can be higher than the cost of the goods on the shelf. In addition, many may know how to make a jar of jam, but not everyone knows how to prepare pork ham or smoked sausages. Even the simple act of freezing is conditioned by the existence of logistics and electricity that works constantly.

Well, then what’s the point of talking about preserving and freezing in our green kitchen? Here are some benefits from my personal experience:

  • it is a good way not to waste products when you have a larger quantity;
  • you can use products that you would not consume in their original form – fruits, which look dubious and from which you make jam or vegetables, transformed into sauces or pickles;
  • you prolong the duration of food consumption – vegetables processed into veggie spread, raw meat transformed into homemade sausages;
  • you can cook once and freeze to consume in the following weeks/ months, thus consuming less energy and time;
  • you control salt, sugar, other preservatives used, and ingredients;

What can you preserve? Virtually anything, there are tons of recipes on the internet or in books. Or you can do a poll among your relatives, you will surely write at least two books on this topic. :))) We still make jams, which have a lot of fruit and a minimum of sugar in them; autumn is for zacusca/ veggie spread and pickles. And because we have a Chef in the family, sometimes we also prepare meat specialties. My grandmother used to make compote and vegetables mix for soups, I have an aunt who makes the best tomato juice and stews mix. The only problem is the storage space – you need a temperature-controlled pantry or cellar that allows you to store cans on a long-term basis.

What can you freeze? Anything. 🙂 Meat, vegetables, fruits, semi-processed or ready-made food. I’ve been a fan of frozen cooked food for two years now, because it saves me from cooking every day. So far I have experimented with various Italian, Mexican or Asian food recipes, including doughs, breads and muffins. Yummy! Mom freezes cabbage rolls – I know, it wouldn’t have crossed your mind. :))) And her genius beef stew sauce.

If you haven’t done this before, then you can start with a recipe or two, right from this month’s #cookingbookclub. Or with your favorite product. If you have already made canned food, you can experiment with new recipes. And if it’s not for you, it’s okay. Right now we are living in happy times, with an incredible variety of products in store. But try to consume from ethical producers and those interested in green cuisine and food sustainability.

#letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen is turning green. Read all the episodes here. And if you’re a beginner disaster, here is a crash class in cooking.

[cakesandcoffee 27] – Pineapple Delight

Today we have to drink and celebrate. What are we celebrating? That it’s summer and holiday season, the fact that we paid our bills, we’ll find something. :))))

I found several recipes for this cocktail, all of which are a combination of rum (Bacardi and Captain Morgan), coconut flavored rum (Malibu), and pineapple juice, plus/minus cranberry juice. 4 parts rum to 5 parts juice. Shaken in a shaker with ice, poured into a glass and garnished with a slice of pineapple and a cherry. From the combination with cranberries it will come out a bit blue… 😛

This version has about one-third Malibu rum and two-thirds pineapple juice, without cranberries, to keep the color of the pineapple. Pour into a tall glass with ice.

If you don’t like coconut, combine with plain rum.

Coffee and cakes are a bonus, if you are on the weight chart (look, another reason to celebrate :)))) )

See all the kitchen disasters here. 🙂 If you tried to destroy the recipe in your kitchen and you succeeded, we would like to hear it too, leave us a comment below; also, write to us if you have any questions or concerns. 🙂

Don’t forget that we also have a #cookingbookclub #disasterinthekitchen, where we experiment with new recipes from cookbooks every month. 🙂

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Cookingbookclub 21 | Giadei de Laurentiis’s recipes

What can I say, I’m a big fan of Giada, because she has simple recipes, many with pasta and vegetables, and she cooks in a familiar Italian style. 🙂

Plus the green kitchen, this month, was with more vegetables and fruits than usual, which is not too difficult in my case. The good thing is that you don’t have to spend a lot of time in front of the stove, because many recipes require a minimum of preparation. And lots of olive oil. :))))

What I cooked:

Bruschetta with mozzarella and strawberries

I love all recipes that combine vegetables and fruits, and bruschetta are delicious and beautiful. 🙂 Toast some slices of bread – use a toaster, a pan or the oven; Giada preferred to bake them, drizzled with olive oil. Separately, in a bowl, mix slices of strawberries and colorful tomatoes (I also put a nectarine) with a vinaigrette of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, pepper and honey. Place a slice of mozzarella and a spoonful of salad on each slice of toast. Garnish with basil. Yummy!!!

Italian carrot salad

Cleaned and washed carrots, grated and mixed with chopped green parsley, some cranberries and a lemon dressing with olive oil. On top add some feta, in my case, or goat cheese, if you like it, to keep to the original recipe.

Baked tomatoes with garlic, cheese and herbs

Cut the tomatoes in half and scoop out the flesh and seeds, then marinate them in olive oil with minced garlic, salt and pepper. Place the tomatoes in a tray or on baking paper and fill them with gorgonzola cheese mixed with breadcrumbs. I used mozzarella and small pieces of bread, sprinkled with the olive oil from the marinade. In the oven, medium temperature, about 20-30 minutes. When ready, decorate with slices of green parsley.

Until next time, have fun destroying recipes. 🙂

#cookingbookclub #letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen becomes green.

Join #disasterinthekitchen club on FacebookInstagram or Pinterest.

Read all the #cookingbookclub articles here. See here all the disasters in the kitchen. And if you’re passionate about #cakesandcoffee, click here. Remember that prevention is easier than treating and that you can’t burn recipes successfully if you don’t know first aid in the kitchen – read more here.

[cakesandcoffee 26] – Erdbeerschnitte or strawberry shortcake

At our house the strawberry shortcake was actually a super quick seasonal fruit cake. For it you need a special tray, round like for tarts, but deeper in the middle, so that you bake the top, turn it and have room for the cream and fruit. Lots of fruit. 😛 But if you don’t have one, a round cake pan with a removable bottom will also work. 🙂

And guess what? Our strawberry shortcake is actually the classic Erdbeerschnitte, with a fluffy sponge cake, a vanilla pudding and strawberries covered in red gelatin. Yummy! 😀

Sponge cake: 4 eggs, 4 tablespoons of sugar, 4 tablespoons of oil, 4 tablespoons of flour, a pinch of salt, a packet of baking powder. Beat 4 egg whites with the salt and 2 spoons of sugar. Separately, mix 4 egg yolks with 2 spoons of sugar, 4 spoons of oil, baking powder with a little lemon juice, then alternately add the egg white foam and 4 spoons of flour. Bake on medium to high heat in a tray lined with baking paper or greased with butter and lined with flour for about 20 minutes. The sponge is done when a toothpick comes out clean.

Vanilla pudding: One packet of Dr. Oetker’s vanilla pudding mixed with 2-3 tablespoons of sugar and 450ml of milk or orange juice, for those like me who are fussy about milk. You follow the instructions on the packet and in a minute you have hot cream that you pour over the cooled sponge cake.

Topping: half a kilogram of strawberries, cleaned of stems and leaves, washed, dried and cut into slices; you arrange them artistically over the pudding, immediately after pouring it. Pour over Dr. Oetker’s red gelatin, made from a packet of gelatin, 2 tablespoons of sugar and 250 ml of water/fruit juice; again see the full instructions.

Rest in the fridge for an hour.

Portion and consume with coffee. Or no coffee. Or you eat directly from the plate. :)))))

PS: The sponge of this ultra-mega-delicious disaster looks so yellow because it’s made with homemade eggs. 🙂

See all the kitchen disasters here. 🙂 If you tried to destroy the recipe in your kitchen and you succeeded, we would like to hear it too, leave us a comment below; also, write to us if you have any questions or concerns. 🙂

Don’t forget that we also have a #cookingbookclub #disasterinthekitchen, where we experiment with new recipes from cookbooks every month. 🙂

Join the kitchen disaster community on our Facebook page or follow us on Instagram or Pinterest.

Special [italian] ep. – vegetables with dried tomatoes and olives

I have to tell you from the beginning that I replaced the dried tomatoes with normal tomatoes – I have never cooked with dried tomatoes and I still don’t feel that is the case. 😀 And instead of zucchini I put squash. 🙂

In a bowl, mix sliced dried tomatoes with olive oil, salt, thyme and green and black olives. In a frying pan, fry in a little oil some thin slices of red onion, slices of red pepper and towards the end, slices of zucchini. Add them warm to the bowl. Stir, let the flavors combine for a few more minutes and serve.

From Giada at Home, by Giada de Laurentiis.

#cookingbookclub #letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen becomes green.

Join #disasterinthekitchen club on FacebookInstagram or Pinterest.

Read all the #cookingbookclub articles here. See here all the disasters in the kitchen. And if you’re passionate about #cakesandcoffee, click here. Remember that prevention is easier than treating and that you can’t burn recipes successfully if you don’t know first aid in the kitchen – read more here.

Cookingbookclub 21

Welcome back to the 21st edition of #cookingbookclub directly from our green kitchen. I hope you did not put the spinach on the fire and that you stocked up on salads because this month we are learning to cook as many vegetables and fruits as possible and we are trying recipes from Giada de Laurentiis!

Vegetables, lots of vegetables, wait… how many vegetables???

I don’t know how you are doing in this regard, but I eat vegetables and fruits regularly. And green stuff – without any eco tint – and stuff of other colors, depending on what is in season, what I find at the supermarket and on price. Where I still have to work is to streamline the process – what to buy and cook, to satisfy my needs, desires and whims – so that I throw away as little as possible.

Because fruits and vegetables are extremely perishable, including those with thousands of chemicals.

For those like me, the challenge is to cook everything, and not throw away, to be creative and reduce the consumption of protein from animal sources and carbohydrates. According to the theory, half of the plate should be fruits and vegetables.

Should we become vegans or vegetarians? At the moment, we like carnivores, if we are a little more responsible. 🙂

Giada de Laurentiis is a perfect proposal, because she cooks Italian, and I am a fan of pasta and I have no problem combining them with many vegetables and fruits. :))))) Get recipes from here, from her website. Or you can find her on Insta and in bookstores.

Don’t forget to leave a comment if you try a recipe and you like it very much. Mine are coming next month – get ready for so maaaaaany recipes. :))))

#cookingbookclub #letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen is turning green.

Join the kitchen disaster community on our Facebook page or follow us on Instagram or Pinterest.

Read all the #cookingbookclub articles here. See here all the disasters in the kitchen. And if you’re passionate about #cakesandcoffee, click here. Remember that prevention is easier than treating and that you can’t burn recipes successfully if you don’t know first aid in the kitchen – read more here.

[greenkitchen3] – this year I eat more veggies and fruits

“I don’t eat vegetables.” I have heard this statement several times from people of different ages and I still do not understand what is it with vegetables and fruits in the diet of the natives. Because the traditional Romanian cuisine contains many recipes with vegetables and fruits. And we love potatoes with a lot of bread, but from time to time it goes with a salad. Even on the magical Transylvanian land. :)))))

Today’s episode of our green kitchen, from which we only throw food when we really have to and seldom rarely and where we exercise our creativity, including in the use of leftover food, is dedicated to the greenest foods: vegetables and fruits, which should not be missing from our diet, even if we are ferocious carnivores and not vegans. 🙂

I BUY

I buy more vegetables and fruits

I buy vegetables and fruits first, then the rest

I buy fresh, seasonal vegetables and fruits and canned/ frozen in the off-season

I buy vegetables and fruits from local producers as much as possible

I COOK

I cook with more vegetables

I cook with fruits (pineapple pizza, anyone? 😀 )

I cook so that half of the daily plate is vegetables and a fruit

I ORDER

I order with more vegetables

I order fruit for dessert, instead of sweets or smoothies

I order salad as a main course, not just a side dish

Well, and how does the kitchen get greener from our consumption of vegetables and fruits? First of all, we will cook healthier, according to the nutritional guidelines in use, because it means a higher intake of vitamins, especially when we vary the vegetables consumed. And no, just fries from McD don’t count.

Secondly, if we increase the intake of vegetables and fruits, it helps us keep our kilograms within normal limits. And at the same time, reduce protein and carbohydrate intake. And if we eat less meat, our carbon emissions also go down. Win-win.

The planet does not want you to be vegan, but it does suggest a moderate consumption of everything. Like a shaorma of common sense. In addition, there are already many vegan alternatives if you want to experiment. Personally, I am a fan of cooking from scratch and less with semi-prepared foods, because you can control what you put in your food, and salt, sugar and fats. And I also think there are enough recipes on the internet to help you even when you’re not very creative.

At tomorrow’s #cookingbookclub we will have a proposal that you will like, suitable for cooking with vegetables and fruits. And I think there are a lot of episodes #disasterinthekitchen over which you can take a look as inspiration.

#letsgetgreen! because this year our kitchen is turning green. Read all the episodes here. And if you’re a beginner disaster, here is a crash class in cooking.